Virtual Antietam Planet

Author: noreply@blogger.com (John David Hoptak)
Posted: 05/06/2014 - 5:00am
May 6, 1864. . .Friday  With the rest of the Ninth Corps, the 48th Pennsylvania crossed the Rapidan River on the morning of May 5, 1864, and marched toward Spotswood Tavern where the regiment went into bivouac. Only a detail of some 200 soldiers of the 48th--under the command of Captain Joseph Hoskings--witnessed any combat that Thursday in the Wilderness when they were detached from the regiment and sent to the army's far right flank, where they skirmished...
Author: noreply@blogger.com (John David Hoptak)
Posted: 05/05/2014 - 5:30am
May 5, 1864. . .Thursday



Much of the Army of the Potomac was already south of the Rapidan River by the time Burnside's Ninth Corps crossed. As the 48th Pennsylvania made its way across, the advance elements of the two armies had already made contact to the west, in the...
Author: noreply@blogger.com (John David Hoptak)
Posted: 05/03/2014 - 4:30pm
Tuesday, May 3, 1864. . .150 years ago. It was the last quiet day. Grant's plans were set. The Union armies--east and west--were ready. But no one in blue or gray could have predicted nor have been fully prepared for the sheer savagery that was about to unfold. In the west, Sherman readied for a drive against Joe Johnston's Army of Tennessee and toward Atlanta while in the east, George Meade, with Grant looking over his shoulder, made the final...
Author: Harry Smeltzer
Posted: 05/03/2014 - 3:28pm
Author: Harry Smeltzer
Posted: 05/01/2014 - 10:02pm
Sorry this has taken so long. The good folks at the Central Ohio Civil War Round Table – they’re in the Columbus area – invited me out to speak to them on the topic of my choice this past March 12. They invited me, jeez, must have been at least 18 months ago. They get […]
Author: Harry Smeltzer
Posted: 05/01/2014 - 6:58pm
Author: Harry Smeltzer
Posted: 04/30/2014 - 11:55am
Hat tip to Phil Spaugy (see his blog here)
Author: noreply@blogger.com (Dan Vermilya)
Posted: 04/30/2014 - 10:21am

While there are far too many books on the Civil War to count, there are surprisingly few on the Confederate forces of the war’s Western Theater actions. In the theater which many historians argue saw the largest impact on the overall strategic outcome of the war, there is a dearth of biographies and examinations of key Confederate leaders. This extends from the relative lack of studies on Braxton Bragg to lesser known generals and officers. One of these lesser known officers is Brigadier...
Author: noreply@blogger.com (John David Hoptak)
Posted: 04/30/2014 - 7:00am
150 years ago, and after a six-week's stay at Annapolis, the soldiers of the 48th Pennsylvania received orders to break camp and take up the line of march toward Washington. With winter gone a new campaign had dawned and the regiment, composed now of a solid core of hard-fighting veterans and hundreds of green recruits, was heading back to the front. The 48th marched away from Annapolis on April 23, 1864, and, by the following night, had arrived within six miles of the nation's capital; falling...
Author: Harry Smeltzer
Posted: 04/25/2014 - 6:42pm
Three new(er) releases from Savas Beatie have hit the shelves. I do apologize for the delay in announcing these, but now that our government has exacted it’s pound of flesh (that is, I have rendered unto Caesar that which is Caesar’s), I’m hoping to get back to more regular posting beyond the stuff I find […]
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